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Try a Clover Club with Fig & Honey

The Clover Club first rose to popularity pre-prohibition. The original calls for raspberry syrup, lending a beautiful vibrant pink colour to the drink. You can add a dash of grenadine to our version if you'd like a deeper colour - but just ensure your end result isn't too sweet for your liking! Challenge: Try to use as many locally sourced products as possible and compost any food waste. Ingredients For the Fig & Honey Syrup:  6 fresh figs diced *currently in season  1 cup local honey  1 cup water  For the Clover Club: 45ml 78° Better Gin 30ml Lemon juice 30ml Fig & Honey Syrup 1 Egg white Thyme sprig to garnish Method For the Fig & Honey Syrup: Combine all...

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Gin: A drink I hated

By Allison Caldicott-Levitt; A girl who hated gin, to a woman whose house feels empty without it   Early in my drinking years, my mother adored Victoria Gin by Victoria Spirits out of BC, Canada. It is a classic West Coast distillery whose flagship gin included classic botanicals alongside orris root, cinnamon bark and rose petals. Growing up, I was never allowed to say I did not like a food or drink if I had not had it, and yet I had an avid disdain for gin despite never trying it, thwarting my mother’s best efforts to get me to give her drink of choice a chance. My intolerance for gin got to an almost phobia-like extreme when I couldn’t have the liquid touch...

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Weird Beers of the World

As today is April 1st, we set out writing this Schmoozeletter with full intention to fool you. Our thought was to promote a ridiculous style of craft beer that had yet to come into existence, but our plans were thwarted while browsing the web and discovering many of our wild creations already existed. We came across a world of beery weirdness, some which were on our radar, some which would no longer be considered weird, and some which confused, fascinated, and tempted us. 

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Barrel Aged Beers

The barrel is a beautiful and complex friend to beer. Wood is a porous material, it ‘breathes’ (expands and contracts) with changes in temperature and humidity, which can lead to oxidative characters in the final product. It also means that the wood is a suitable habitat for bacteria and wild yeasts. Depending on what style you were brewing these characters could be favourable, or quite the opposite. Sans some Belgian (ie. Lambic) and other styles, the presence of funk or tartness would largely be considered an infection in modern day brewing, however if you think of the fact that wood was the primary material used for beer in the past, it's extremely likely that all historical beers would have had...

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Conversing with a Lambic Enthusiast

This is Jeremy: (He's on the right. You can also find Jez on the internet @coldfizzyones) Those of you who live nearby have maybe chatted with Jez in our Thornbury shop or recognise him from events at the bar. He's our resident Lambic enthusiast and an all around great guy, so we figured we'd sit him down to ask our most funky questions. Enjoy! -- What turned you onto Lambic?The unparalleled funk & complexity of Lambic was the main drawcard. It’s also such a versatile base for fruit additions, so there were plenty of options to explore. And what has kept you enthralled by the style?The proliferation of wine/Lambic hybrids – it’s the best of both worlds. Do you remember the first Lambic you...

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